Religion and Spirituality

Share The Well

share the well.jpgI don’t actually have a CD player here in Scotland, but if I did, Caedmon’s Call’s Share the Well would be in it. The band (which I have liked for a long time) spent time in the developing world, facing the issues which most of us refuse to face.

I have one hang-up about the CD, particularly the inside cover. This is what it says:

“In many towns in India Dalits are not allowed to drink water from a well. They must go to the well to beg for a higher caste person to share and often no one does. Hinduism tells them they are worthless with no hope for change and the caste system only reinforces these lies. So when they hear the truth about God – that He loves them, He made them in His image, and that Jesus came to die so they could be with Him – they are overcome. In John 4 Jesus breaks social taboos and drinks after the Samaritan woman at the well and then He offers her the living water, “A well of water springing up into everlasting life”. At first, this may seem like a call for social justice and as followers of Christ we are commanded to look after the poor and weak. But in the end it is a call to evangelism. We are bearers of a well that will never run dry. Will we share the well?”

What I would have written:

In many towns in India Dalits are not allowed to drink water from a well. They must go to the well to beg for a higher caste person to share and often no one does. Hinduism tells Perverters of Hinduism’s message tell them they are worthless with no hope for change and the caste system only reinforces these lies. So when they hear the truth about God – He loves them, He made them in His image, and that Jesus came to die so they could be with Him that God loves them and made them in God’s image, and that Jesus exhibited the lengths to which Love was willing to go – they are overcome. In John 4 Jesus breaks social taboos and drinks after the Samaritan woman at the well and then He offers her the living water, “A well of water springing up into everlasting life”. At first, this may seem like a call for social justice and as followers of Christ we are commanded to look after the poor and weak. But in the end it is a call to evangelism. to evangelism. But in the end it is a call for social justice, and as followers of Christ we are commanded to look after the poor and weak. We are bearers of a well that will never run dry. Will we share the well?

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5 thoughts on “Share The Well”

  1. Randall Goodgame wrote several of the songs on that album, and right now his “War and Peace” has been in my CD player (something which, as I am not in Scotland, I do have) quite often lately. He recorded both “Share the well” and “I did not catch her name” on it, along with some other thoughtful, light-hearted songs too. Really good stuff. Your editing is interesting, because the song commentary that RG himself makes on the CC site also takes a little bit different tone than the cover notes. My thoughts, I don’t know, I fall somewhere between all three.

    I hope Scotland is treating you well. I saw Andrew’s Glencoe pictures posted earlier this week, and it appears to be doing just that! The Tuesday jaunts out to 61st are missing something this semester. Take care!

  2. Changing “He” to “God”? Does the Scripture not use masculine language to refer to God? Maybe I missed your point.

    I think you’re both getting it wrong: evangelism and social justice are flip sides of the same coin. They go hand in hand.

    I’m glad you’re enjoying your time in Scotland, Mark. Met any cute Scottish girls (there are a few, but only a few)?

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